The Jonah syndrome

The Jonah syndrome

by Kamel Daoud: What remains for “Arab” intellectuals after the Charlie Hebdo events? Faced with end-of-the-world jihadism, any intellectual identified as “Arab” is afflicted ...

Federal election 2015: The leaders, the issues and the unknowns

Federal election 2015: The leaders, the issues and the unknowns

by Dominic Cardy: You would have to be foolish to predict the shape of the government that will form after the October ...

Russia’s ecumenical jihadist

Russia’s ecumenical jihadist

by Ronald Beiner: Who is Aleksandr Dugin and why is he saying all these terrible things about the West? Aleksandr Dugin has come ...

The radical left Syriza in power:
 Will it change Greece – and Europe?

The radical left Syriza in power:
 Will it change Greece – and Europe?

by Irene Martín: Will the Greek election of January 2015 change the direction of European politics? As I write in early May, we ...

Podemos and Spain’s new political landscape

Podemos and Spain’s new political landscape

by Marc Sanjaume: Just as happened in Greece on January 25, the election in Spain later this year will transform the political ...

The strange case of the missing Aboriginal women

The strange case of the missing Aboriginal women

by Garth Stevenson: If you live in Canada and have not recently returned from a long sabbatical on another planet, you have probably ...

The Tories’ “big idea”

The Tories’ “big idea”

by John Richards: In late April, Joe Oliver, Canada’s current Finance Minister, delivered his first budget. In a nice touch, the budget ...

The Jonah syndrome

The Jonah syndrome

Author: Kamel Daoud 1
Federal election 2015: The leaders, the issues and the unknowns

Federal election 2015: The leaders, the issues and the unknowns

Author: Dominic Cardy 2
Russia’s ecumenical jihadist

Russia’s ecumenical jihadist

Author: Ronald Beiner 3
The radical left Syriza in power:
 Will it change Greece – and Europe?

The radical left Syriza in power:
 Will it change Greece

Author: Irene Martin 4
Podemos and Spain’s new political landscape

Podemos and Spain’s new political landscape

Author: Marc Sanjaume 5
The strange case of the missing Aboriginal women

The strange case of the missing Aboriginal women

Author: Garth Stevenson 6
The Tories’ “big idea”

The Tories’ “big idea”

Author: John Richards 7

Inside the Current Issue

From the deadly attacks in Paris to the left-wing Syriza party’s election victory in Greece, news from Europe loomed large in the early months of 2015. Inroads 37 takes an in-depth look at these developments . Three critical Arab writers respond to the Paris attacks. Irene Martín analyzes the implications of Syriza’s victory, while Marc Sanjaume examines the rise of its kindred party in Spain, Podemos. Ronald Beiner sketches the ideas and influence of Aleksandr Dugin, an ideologue who seeks to unite enemies of liberalism under Russian leadership. Back in Canada, two articles look ahead to October’s federal election, while another questions the need for an inquiry into missing and murdered Aboriginal women.

Recent issues

Inroads_36 COVER
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Among the thematic articles in the current issue:

The Devil and Stephen Harper

by Reg Whitaker

7_Stephen_Harper_by_Remy_SteineggerThe Prime Minister was delivering an apocalyptic warning to his country. Like an ancient Hebrew prophet, Stephen Harper conjured a satanic spectre: “A great evil has been descending over our world, an evil that has been growing more and more powerful.” This ogre is “violent jihadism … one of the most dangerous enemies our world has ever faced.”

Harper was speaking with the conviction that comes from personal experience. After all, he had only recently emerged from the closet where he hid while a “violent jihadist” was gunned down by the parliamentary Sergeant-at-Arms. Out of the closet, he had morphed into the Avenging Angel, and he had a lethal weapon of his own: Bill C-51, The Anti-terrorism Act 2015. But Read more

 

Dying later, dying differently, dying when we want

1016-euthanasiaby Arthur Milner

At the age of ninety-three and a half, my mother went for 30-minute walks. Then she took a turn for the worse. We went to the doctor. “Doctor,” she said, “I would like to die. Can you help me?” “No,” said the doctor, “and don’t ask me again.” After that, she frequently asked family members to help her die. She suggested going to Switzerland.1 We were concerned, but no one did anything.

She walked more slowly, then she needed a walker, then a wheelchair. She was often sleepy. She got a lung infection and was sent to the hospital. She refused to be admitted, went home with enough analgesic to keep her dopey and, three days later, died. The Read more

 

Electoral reform: Here’s the evidence, Mr. Trudeau

The alternative vote is not a significant improvement over what we have now

 by Dennis Pilon

8As the Liberals gear up for October’s federal election, there is much talk of reconnecting with Canadians and remaking the party’s policy profile. One of the party’s big ideas is democratic reform. Justin Trudeau ran for the leadership on democratic renewal, including a specific commitment to champion a new voting system: the alternative vote (AV). In a leadership debate in Vancouver in 2013 he declared that AV would “change the tone of politics completely” because politicians would need to reach out to voters of other parties. Since then, other senior Liberals have echoed his views. In August 2014 Deputy Leader Ralph Goodale asserted that AV “requires you Read more

 

Two worlds that can never understand each other

11_tahar_ben_jelloun

When I was a child, my father often mentioned Denmark and Sweden as examples of civilized countries, real democracies where citizens had rights and duties. I remember him sighing, as if to make us understand that our own country was a long way from this situation. With his modest income, he was never able to travel to these countries, but he was fascinated by the equality among citizens, and between men and women, that prevailed there. He was especially intrigued by the monarchy in Nordic countries, which people respected as a symbolic system without having to put up with its escapades and extravagances. He also recalled Denmark’s attitude toward the Jews at the time of the gas chambers. In short, Read more

 
 

The Paris attacks were foreseeable events

by Mezri Haddad

9_hebdo office_ceedot via flickrFor most analysts and politicians, the carnage at Charlie Hebdo and the hostage-taking in Vincennes – the first offensives in the war against France and the Republic – are traumas that nobody could have anticipated. But not for the French Muslim elite, or for the soldiers in the clandestine war against terrorism, or for the few journalists who dare to name the unnameable at the risk of being accused of Islamophobia. Along with enlightened Muslim intellectuals, they knew that this had to happen some day. They know to fear the worst if those in power don’t take this national tragedy as an occasion for a thorough review of their policy on immigration, integration, education, the Read more